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Still Life Still

Girls Come Too

Rating: 3.0/5.0

Label: Arts & Crafts

Girls Come Too is the debut album from Still Life Still, a five-piece from the Toronto, Ontario region. It’s a promising album that struggles to get out from under the sonic shadow of the city’s godfather band, Broken Social Scene, though, escaping the influence of BSS is not made easier by being on the BSS record label, or having BSS’ prolific Kevin Drew produce Girls Come Too; songs such as “Danse Cave” and “Neon Blue” sound like they would have been right at home on Broken Social Scene or Introducing Kevin Drew. One has to wonder how much this is a case of a really young band mimicking their idols, and how much is heavy-handedness on the producer’s part.

In a way, it’s a compliment to musicianship of these 22 year olds that they can craft such a rhythmically dense pop sound. The slow, ambient “Planets” nestles up quite nicely to the more rockish “Knives in Cartoons” and its distorted guitars and dance floor drums. Despite the former’s energy however, much of {Girls Come Too} strives to establish a confessional air of intimacy, such as the discussion of family history on “Kid,” a track that’s kept from too-typical teenage angst by a mid-tempo Modest Mouse riff. However much of the album’s intimacy is undermined by a certain hamfistedness and chauvinism in lyrics like “If you don’t mind my cum on your tit/ Then I don’t mind your blood on my dick” as on “T-Shirts,” or “Flowers And A Wreath’s” casual attempt to woo with the line “If I gave up/ Would you still wanna fuck?

Supposedly Still Life Still have been performing some of these songs for almost a decade, meaning since the members had barely entered in high school. This might explain some of the juvenile sexism of the band, because when not singing about romance, they are capable of infusing a degree of tension and pathos into some of their songs. Earlier in “Flowers and a Wreath,” the domestic scene is set on edge when the song turns to “wanting the wolves to come into our house.” On “Planets”, the imagery of wolves returns, along with seahorses and a whimsical ride along the solar system where “we can lie on a comet and comb our hair.”

With the release of their first full-length, Still Life Still are embarking on a major tour of Canada and the western United States, which is probably the best thing for them. Hopefully, the exposure to other bands and crowds will help them develop their own musical identity. There’s a lot of talent and potential on Girls Come Too, but also evidence that a lot of maturing that needs to happen.

by Sean Marchetto
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