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A Sunny Day in Glasgow

Nitetime Rainbows EP

Rating: 2.5/5.0

Label: Mis Ojos Discos

Nitetime Rainbows is a 36-minute remix EP. At first glance, that looks pretty damning, but when you realize A Sunny Day in Glasgow’s discography has continually pushed past the hour mark, it’s a little more acceptable. It also helps that the song in question, (the appropriately titled “Nitetime Rainbows”) happens to be the best cut off of the band’s 2009 pretty-excellent LP, Ashes Grammar. So it’s no surprise that the EP does come off as a bit of a victory lap. However, the outtake tracks are decent enough, and the remixes are interesting enough, that it’s at least a listenable victory lap.

After the celebratory spin of the “Nitetime Rainbows,” we move directly into “Daytime Rainbows,” a clever, sunnier, two-minute respite a la Aesop Rock’s “Daylight/Nightlight” dichotomy. That’s followed by two would-be B-sides; there’s the thoroughly gross-sounding “So Bloody, So Tight,” mixing a stabbing synthesizer and a gentle acoustic guitar, sounding fairly obviously born out of the Ashes Grammar sessions and “Piano Lessons,” a much more beautiful, much more memorable lullaby that keeps itself deeply mired in the band’s patented haze, while also letting a crystalline piano extrude well into tangibility – ending up being the EP’s best cut, and one of the best songs the band has written as a whole.

From there we move into the remix side of the record, where ultra-obscure heroes like Benoit Pioulard and Ezekiel Honig sprinkle their respective fairy dust on the title-track. Honig sacrifices the blanketing sonics that defined the base song, instead letting it build from a heartbeat bass and a hospital-bed inhale, before ending with an acoustic guitar spiral. Pioulard does the predictable thing, deconstructing the track to its minerals then smashing it with massive industrialized throbs, all of it lasting merely three-and-a-half minutes. But the best remix reward ends up going to the Buddy System who, for the most part, leave the song as it is, only glistening it up a little with a shinier rhythm section, contorting the guitar bits and giving the song’s Tiki Tiki Room choir a more pronounced role in the midsection – after all, a song as good as “Nitetime Rainbows” needs a light touch at most.

Nitetime Rainbows, though a victory lap, comes barely half a year after A Sunny Day in Glasgow’s last full-length. And remixes notwithstanding, it only has about three songs you may not have heard before, and out of those three, about two of them are worth listening to. So mathematically, it’s not an easy album to recommend – unless you’re somehow already starving for new music from the band.

by Luke Winkie
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