Don’t listen to anyone who claims that Slow Club has a “sound.” As if Rebecca Taylor and Charles Watson’s previous three albums weren’t evidence enough that they can jump from anti-folk to indie rock to soul, the duo’s fourth album, the pessimistically titled One Day All of This Won’t Matter Any More, shatters any expectations for a “consistent” sound while managing to flaunt their immense sonic reach in the span of one 12-track album. One Day illustrates the very mutability of Slow Club’s indie sound, one that bridges folk, rock and dreampop, making for the most holistic showcase yet of the band’s talents.

The most consistent thing about One Day—and the biggest indicator of Taylor and Watson’s confidence as writers—is the effort’s lethargic pace. Over the course of three albums, it’s become obvious that Watson tends to write these slow-building epics. Taylor is the more direct and aggressive one. But, with the influence of producer Matthew E. White, One Day embraces that broody, almost woozy, slow pace. And the effect of having White’s in-house band at Spacebomb Studios play these songs—as opposed to Taylor and Watson playing most of the instruments—and record them live accentuates the usual chemistry on a Slow Club album tenfold and gives off an infectiously warm, assuredly smooth vibe.

Starting with opener “Where the Light Gets Lost,” there’s a hint of the soul from Complete Surrender on the organ, a bit of funk in the bass and guitar lines. But when Taylor joins Watson on the chorus, it all clicks. Whether it’s the in-house band vibe, the timeless pining in the lyrics or the female backing choir, the song exudes classic ’60s sultriness. Whereas the hooks on Paradise were explosive, the format of this recording setup truly softens these ballads. The shamelessly blues-inspired “Ancient Rolling Sea” bears the hallmarks of a classic Watson guitar-fueled number, but even he would have previously played this two times faster. The epitome of languid ballads, though, is Taylor’s “Come on Poet.” Crooning low, her controlled vocals are paired with a sultry R&B beat and a straining guitar. It’s only when Taylor unleashes on the chorus that the guitar lifts itself into a starry-eyed riff.

Despite the outside influences on this album, the central chemistry between Taylor and Watson is still at the core of these tracks. There is a distinct give and take, back and forth in the track order. As many times as the duo harmonize and share vocal duties, they also carry songs solo. Watson’s romantic dejection permeates several tracks, starting with “Where the Light Gets Lost,” as he sings, “I had my chance to try to let you know/ I had my chance and this is letting go.” Taylor delivers a strikingly similar message on “Rebecca Casanova”: “I don’t wanna be guilty of knowing I could have let you out to find her sooner.” It’s a surprising synthpop number that’s all stuttering guitar, sparkling synths and bouncing pop beats. And the song’s very melody sounds like a slowed down ’90s pop track.

But “Rebecca Casanova” isn’t the only upbeat song on One Day. The album may emphasize slow pop over the bursting emotions of Paradise, but it’s not all glum. “Give Me Some Peace” combines gospel choir with ’60s girl groups. “Silver Morning,” “Tattoo” and “Champion” are Watson’s main outlets for unabashedly bouncy indie guitars on this album. But while “Silver Morning” is more soul-rock, “Tattoo” has this straight-up disco vibe and “Champion” can’t escape its country roots. And country is something that creeps into One Day a lot, especially on “In Waves,” which pairs Taylor’s best country croon with a haunting lap steel guitar.

While most of these songs—however sad-lite or downright dark they are—deal in melancholic tales, the playfulness in Slow Club’s very insistence on juggling styles maintains a kind of satisfyingly buoyant mood. Not all sad songs make you feel sad, and Taylor and Watson continue to prove that they are the masters of the emotional resonance of their songs as they push their words, tone and arrangement to straddle emotional lines.

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