Hell is empty and all the devils are here, because hell’s always been closer to home than we realize. In the eyes of Ladytron, purveyors of electroclash, synthpop and ever-so-slightly mischievous lyricism, the true dangers lie in the world in which we reside. With no sense of pomp or circumstance, they titled their latest effort Ladytron, as if signaling to listeners that this is the band’s true message after years of self-reflection. As the world ends right before our eyes, Ladytron takes it upon themselves to supply the soundtrack.

Somber and devastating elements arise in all of Ladytron’s material, which always manages to channel fear and loathing into something danceable. In the same way Danity Kane’s “Damaged” notches heartbreak up a few more beats per minute than one may be used to, Ladytron makes the macabre suitable for the club. Mutual commiseration is preferable to suffering solo, and Ladytron enjoins fans to share and suffer together.

Singers Mira Aroyo and Helen Marnie exemplify this modern condition of processing bad news with a sense of detachment. It’s not that they don’t care, it’s just that one can’t get too riled up about things without going a bit batshit. To keep themselves cool, Ladytron run with their fears rather than running from them. In opener “Until the Fire”, they lay in wait for the coming conflagration as opposed to heading for the hills. This is the way the world ends, not with a bang but with a synthesizer.

The metaphors, from towering mountains to vast oceans, suggest a world with a mind of its own and Ladytron as their vessels, sending messages to those smart enough to listen: “In the west is where we’ll rise/ Just like the smoke as it hurts our eyes”. Though the natural disasters loom high on this record, Ladytron also delves into more personal tragedies. “You’ve Changed” confronts its target head on, simultaneously deriding and deconstructing their behavior as a new person. “Deadzone” meanwhile refers to a state of being rather than a lifeless patch of water in Lake Erie. The same way some believe in the Earth’s soul, Gaia, Ladytron believe Earth’s traumas can illuminate aspects of our own.

Ladytron’s commitment to its sound provides cohesion to the tracks, but it also means they often run the risk of sounding repetitive or recycled sounds. “Until the Fire” need not be five minutes of repeated choruses, and “Figurine”’s opening chords could easily supply the start of “Destroy Everything You Touch” Pt II. It makes for some annoyances, though it also speaks to the band’s vision for themselves.

Some of the most pleasant moments happen in tracks that deviate a bit from their usual fare. “The Island” tones down their standard power-walk tempo for something a little more loose, while the rumble and horns of “Horrorscope” gives their unease a new mode of expression. The finale, “Tomorrow Is Another Day,” slow-builds into something unexpected: hopefulness for a better future. After an entire album of disappointments and disasters, Ladytron manages to find strength in the “scars, frozen and framed” from the past. These marks provide the roadmap towards healing and a new day, emerging from the ashes burnt but renewed.

Much like an ecosystem after it suffers a flood or fire, Ladytron features a band rejuvenated by its own survival. They return but not as they did before. “We are more like you/ Than the ones that you knew,” they say on “The Animals,” and it could easily be the band referring to itself, who sound as much like themselves as ever.

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