History and Presence: by Robert Orsi
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History and Presence: by Robert Orsi

The Absolved: by Matthew Binder
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The Absolved: by Matthew Binder

Binder’s work recalls that of Brett Easton Ellis in that he can make an oversexed, overpaid, chauvinist protagonist dynamic and symbolic without bashing readers over the head with…

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I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: by Michelle McNamara
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I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: by Michelle McNamara

I’ll Be Gone in the Dark is a great book, a classic of the genre. It is also a eulogy.

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The Curse of Bigness: by Tim Wu
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The Curse of Bigness: by Tim Wu

The Curse of Bigness is a primer for a more egalitarian America, the like of which we have never seen.

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Atlas of the Irish Revolution: Edited by John Crowley, Dónal Ó Drisceoil, Mike Murphy and John Borgonovo
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Atlas of the Irish Revolution: Edited by John Crowley, Dónal Ó Drisceoil, Mike Murphy and John Borgonovo

Encourages students, teachers and the serious investigator to reflect on the troubles which these heady and confused decades have bequeathed across the landscape and its inhabitants.

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We the People: by Erwin Chemerinsky
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We the People: by Erwin Chemerinsky

Dreadful Young Ladies: by Kelly Barnhill
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Dreadful Young Ladies: by Kelly Barnhill

Barnhill’s tales will capture the hearts of adults but will also help introduce younger readers to the depth of reading for adults.

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The Night Ocean: by Paul La Farge
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The Night Ocean: by Paul La Farge

A tribute to H.P. Lovecraft’s work and an investigation into the posthumously deified author’s real life.

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Apollo 8: by Jeffrey Kluger
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Apollo 8: by Jeffrey Kluger

Space still holds the collective imagination, but it feels like the province of billionaires now.

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Freud: The Making of an Illusion: by Frederick Crews
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Freud: The Making of an Illusion: by Frederick Crews

What would drive an essayist and literary critic to craft a meticulous, 700-plus page takedown of Sigmund Freud?

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